Eldercare Resources

What you can do to help your loved one get better faster after a hospital or rehab stay

What you can do to help your loved one get better faster after a hospital or rehab stay

ONE FALL CAN CHANGE EVERYTHING and that is what has inspired me to begin this series on how to help your loved one get better faster after a hospital or rehab stay.
Read more
How to reduce the cost of in-home elder care

How to reduce the cost of in-home elder care

For every day that an older adult spends in a hospital or rehab, they need three to five days to return to their pre-hospital level of functioning. There are three things that I do to help my clients to lower their costs.
Read more
Assisted Living At Home - Self-Care Is Important For ElderCare

Assisted Living At Home - Self-Care Is Important For ElderCare

Thank you for being a loyal reader. The last time, we discussed Sundowners Syndrome. One of the five things you could do to help your loved one who suffers from Sundowners Syndrome is to care for yourself. Today, we are discussing strategies for caring for yourself, so that your care recipient can THRIVE.

What are some strategies for self-care?

It may take some time to find the best way to care for yourself as you care for someone experiencing Sundowners. Here are a few strategies worth considering.

  • First, STAY CALM & MASTER YOUR EMOTIONS AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE. Sundowners cause fear and anxiety. Do not argue with your loved one. Listen to their concerns and validate their feelings, all the while reassuring that they are is safe. Feeling heard will comfort and calm your loved one. They will lean on you for comfort and reassurance. Also, emotions are attractors, so anxiety in you will trigger anxiety in your loved one. When your loved one thrives, your role as the caregiver becomes more gratifying than stressful.

  • Second, develop a LONG TERM CARE PLAN FOR YOUR LOVED ONE. Most of the stress associated with family caregiving comes from the lack of a caregiving plan. If you would like a copy of our free e-book on how to design a personalized long-term care plan for your loved one, contact Comfort Makers at 503-369-2460.

  • Third, MAKE RESPITE CARE A PRIORITY. Respite care provides short-term relief for primary caregivers. It can be arranged for just an afternoon or for several days or weeks. Care can be provided at home, in a healthcare facility, or at an adult day center. Caregiving can be taxing, both emotionally and physically. Respite care is a beautiful part of self-care. Respite care is an investment in the health of your loved one too.

Finding someone your loved one feels comfortable with, other than yourself, so you can take breaks, take naps during the day, spend time with friends and keep up on your own hobbies is part of your respite plan. Also, Comfort Makers provides respite care services.

When care is needed, there is a caregiver in need. It is my hope that when it is your turn to care, I can always be there for you and your loved one.

–Katie

Read more
Assisted Living At Home - Sundowning Syndrome

Assisted Living At Home - Sundowning Syndrome

In the coming weeks, I want to discuss Sundowning Syndrome because more than 60% of adults who suffer from cognitive impairment experience a certain set of sundowning (neuropsychiatric) symptoms which makes caring for them even more challenging.

So, what is sundowners syndrome?

It is neuropsychiatric symptoms that affect many adults who suffer from late-stage Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Symptoms of sundowners syndrome include confusion, disorientation, irritability, restlessness, agitation, suspicious feelings, and a demanding demeanor. There is no test available to diagnose sundowners. Diagnosis is based on appearance and frequency of symptoms.

Watch your loved one for symptoms, especially during the late afternoon. Record your findings and talk with a doctor about your concerns. There is also no cure for sundowners. Very often, the symptoms of sundowners syndrome usually intensify as the syndrome progresses. Symptoms can become more regular and severe and might include delusions, paranoia, hallucinations, fear, and anxiety.

Five ways to help mitigate Sundowning Syndrome symptoms

Although there is no cure for sundowners, there are five things that have been shown to help with the symptoms:

  1. PROVIDE A WELL-LIGHTED ENVIRONMENT. Adequate light can calm those suffering from sundowners and ease fears or confusion around their surroundings. Close window shades as evening approaches and turn on indoor lights.

  2. MANAGE PHYSICAL NEEDS. Ensure your loved one eats well and is well hydrated. Control their pain needs as directed by a doctor. Help your loved one get more sleep.

  3. PROVIDE A CALM AND PEACEFUL LIVING SPACE. Keep noise to a minimum, play relaxing music, or do an activity your loved one enjoys.

  4. MAINTAIN A DAILY SCHEDULE. This will help your loved one manage expectations of what is happening.

  5. CARE FOR YOURSELF FIRST. Caring for yourself reduces anxiety and promotes life balance. Emotions are attractors and when you are thriving your loved one will do the same. Next week, we will discuss strategies for caring for yourself.

My favorite thing to do as the owner of Comfort Makers is to help families to find customized, affordable, and life-enhancing caregiving solutions that can transform caregiving into a gratifying experience. If I can be of help, please contact our office.

–Katie
katie@comfort-makers.com | 503-369-2460

Read more
Assisted Living At Home - Finding Money For Senior Care

Assisted Living At Home - Finding Money For Senior Care

Here is a TRUTH; if funding care were not an issue, most older adults would elect to remain in their homes. However, sometimes being at home is not the safest nor psychosocially healthiest option.
Read more
Assisted Living At Home - Keeping Mom Dry When She Is Resistant To Change

Assisted Living At Home - Keeping Mom Dry When She Is Resistant To Change

In my work as a geriatric care manager, there are three main issues that most caregiving families deal with.
  1. Where should care be provided; at home, in an assisted living facility, or in a nursing home.
  2. Where to find the money to pay for long-term adult care.
  3. How to manage in-home care especially when there are dementia and/or mobility issues.
Read more
Assisted Living At Home - Supplementing what Medicare covers

Assisted Living At Home - Supplementing what Medicare covers

After a level of care assessment, here is an option for Katy’s father. This could help him stay at home or delay the need for a move into a facility. Here are the action steps: 1. Ask the doctor...
Read more
Assisted Living At Home - Providing Long Distance Care for Loved Ones

Assisted Living At Home - Providing Long Distance Care for Loved Ones

This week is about a daughter named Katy from Florida. Her dad lives in Oregon, has incontinence and memory loss, and Katy, like many long-distance family caregivers, thinks that it is time to move into an assisted living facility. The problem is that Katy can’t be here, nor can she get here (COVID restrictions) to do the legwork and paperwork needed to move him, and, in the meantime, he needs around-the-clock care. What could Katy do?
Read more
Assisted Living At Home - What Is a Care Assessment?

Assisted Living At Home - What Is a Care Assessment?

n the previous weeks, I discussed what Katy (a long-distance caregiver in Florida with a dad in Oregon) could do to care for her dad. COVID-19 restrictions made it almost impossible for her to move her dad into an assisted living facility. I recommended the free level of care assessment offered by the Area Agency on Aging (AAA) that sparked a few questions. So today is a good day to answer the question.
Read more
Assisted Living At Home - Struggling with Incontinence

Assisted Living At Home - Struggling with Incontinence

Last year, I had to relocate for work so my mother moved in with my brother and sister in- law. In the past few months, my mother has been struggling with heavy incontinence. Now my sister-in-law wants my mother to move into an assisted living facility because she cannot deal with the smell of urine on the furniture from my mom’s accidents. My mom is devastated about the need to move, are there other options?
Read more
Female caregiver reading a book to an elderly man in a wheel chair

As our parents grow older, it can create stress on the adult children of aging parents.

The world is changing; we live longer than we ever have before and, by the year 2030, one in five Americans will be over the age of 65!
Read more
Young man helping his aging mother to bed

Overnight adult care products that will make your life easier

For aging adults and their caregivers, waking up to wet pajamas and bedding is not a great way to begin the day. The good news is there are many things you can do to reduce and even stop overnight leaks.

Read more
14 results