Eldercare Resources

When family caregiving follows you to work. Part 2 of 9

When family caregiving follows you to work. Part 2 of 9

Part two of nine: Last time, I started a series from questions that came by email (to the Going Home, Staying weekly virtual session that I cohost with other geriatric experts) from the CFO and some of his employees who are also caring for loved ones.

Q: When my mom is coming home from a skilled rehab facility after being in the hospital, what services do I need in place?

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What to do when your family caregiving follows you to work. Part 1 of 9

What to do when your family caregiving follows you to work. Part 1 of 9

Recently I have been cohosting a weekly Tuesday virtual mini-class at 11 a.m. PST on zoom. The title of the class is GOING HOME STAYING HOME: Advice, Tips & Practical Solutions For Caregiving Families.
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What do you do when caregiving follows you to work?

What do you do when caregiving follows you to work?

My last post discussed "How to talk to your aging loved ones in a way that they would listen and respond." I have been co-hosting a free one-hour weekly virtual seminar called Going Home, Staying Home. My co-hosts are nurses and nurse practitioners, and we answer caregiving questions live on zoom. When family caregivers can't attend, they can email their inquiries, and then we will answer the questions and send the replay links.

Last week, we had a very engaging session. We received nine questions from a CFO who happens to need care for his parents and who also needs help for his employees who are family caregivers. Can you imagine the conversations that occur in their break room about caregiving? In the upcoming weeks, I will answer one question each week. Their questions' theme is "Caregiving and what to do when caregiving follows you to work." Caregiving is generally defined as providing unpaid assistance for another person's physical and emotional needs. A study cited in the Academy of Management Journal focused on what today's caregiving employees really need, and it addressed the relationship between caregiving decisions, work-family conflict and work performance. This study showed that employees who are family caregivers frequently suffer high levels of stress, anxiety, irritability, depression, physical illness, obesity, financial insecurity, isolation and poor self-esteem.

In many cases, caregiving employees reported that their home life amounted to a "second shift of work." At an employer level, employees who are also caregiving can directly affect corporate earnings. This negative impact is caused by its effect on the worker's job performance, absenteeism, loss of productivity, time lost from work, inability to stay on the job, higher healthcare cost due to stress, and higher cost of recruitment, retention, training and supervisory challenges.

In my next post, we will begin the 9-part discussion on what to do when your caregiving roles conflict with your work and career obligations. If you are a business owner who provides caregiving or has employees who perform a "second shift of work" as caregivers, I am here to help.

Call or email anytime. See you next time during Going Home, Staying Home.

Photo by Elisa Ventur on Unsplash

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“YOU” versus “I” - What to say and how to say it so that your parents will listen

“YOU” versus “I” - What to say and how to say it so that your parents will listen

Caregiving is universally the greatest art of love. Still, it could wreck your life if you do not apply practical strategies for communicating your needs, being heard, retaining the appropriate professional services, staying sane and finding balance in your role as a family caregiver.
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Resources & help for patients going home after a hospital stay

Resources & help for patients going home after a hospital stay

I recently received the following question about resources to help after a hospital stay.

My husband suffered a stroke in March and has been in and out of the hospital ever since. The rehab facility recommends that he be transferred to a memory care unit for a month because he can’t quite remember things. Most people in the memory care unit have Alzheimer’s but he does not. I would rather take him home, but my children are worried that I can’t care for him. I don’t know what to do.

Multiple readmissions to a hospital and/or rehab facility interrupt recovery. The time that could be used for therapy is lost in logistics, admissions and management of symptoms. Very often, patients in rehab facilities seem weaker or worse partly because of the interruptions in the care programs. You have the right to request in-home rehab. A memory care unit will not improve his memory in a month. Actually, it might make things difficult and worse for him because a new environment can cause increased levels of confusion.

Here are 3 simple steps you could use to help him get the right type of care outside of the rehab:

  1. Ask the rehab facility to organize a discharge planning care conference so that you can have firsthand information about the amount and level of care he needs at home. A discharge planning meeting is usually attended by the therapists, nurse, social worker or discharge planner.

  2. Request for a care management consultation so that a care manager can help develop a restorative caregiving program that will promote his wellness, help him stay out of the emergency room, learn how to live with chronic symptoms, feel happier and thrive regardless of any life-limiting diagnosis.

  3. Attend the next GOING HOME STAYING HOME SESSION. These are no-cost telephone or Zoom sessions held every Tuesday (at 11 a.m. PST) designed to provide practical advice and resources for caregiving families dealing with the aftermath of a hospital admission. For more information or to get the call-in numbers or zoom link, call or email me today.

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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 5 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 5 of 5)

This is the last part of my 5 part my long-distance family caregiving series. In recent weeks we have been covering the story of a lady named Sally who has several health problems, has been hospitalized quite a bit, and is at risk of being placed into a long-term care facility.
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 4 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 4 of 5)

This is part 4 of my five-part long-distance family caregiving series. In parts 1, 2 and 3 we discussed Sally’s health challenges, the results of her long-term care survey, and the team of professionals needed to help Sally remain in her home happily while getting good care. The survey asks very good questions such as where (in their private residence or in a retirement community) your loved one would like to be cared for, who wo
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 3 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 3 of 5)

This is part 3 of my long-distance family caregiving series. In parts 1 and 2, we discussed Sally’s health challenges, the lack of a long-term care plan, the stress associated with her care, and the steps I used to help Sally and her son. First, I conducted a long-term care survey with an in-home care assessment.
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 2 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 2 of 5)

Sally has to decide to either go into an assisted living community or stay at home. Her son lives on the east coast, and he does not have a plan to care for his mom from afar. His dad (Sally's husband and then caregiver) died recently. So how do I begin to help Sally and her son? This is a popular question amongst caregiving families
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 1 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 1 of 5)

Caring from afar is also known as long-distance family caregiving. This series is inspired by a son who lives on the east coast but cares for an aging parent in our community. Can you picture this situation? Mother (Sally, made up name) is 85 years old.
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Improving hydration in older adults

Improving hydration in older adults

Someone once said, "Sure, Katie, sounds easy for you to say, but I can't get my mom to drink enough water." If this is your experience, you are not alone. Today I will share tips for improving hydration in older adults, but first, here is why water is SO important.
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How to speed up your loved one's recovery after a hospital stay

How to speed up your loved one's recovery after a hospital stay

 If you search on Google, you might find a long list of providers, and if you call the council on aging, you will get a ton of information. However, how do you know which service to get, and how do you know what Medicare will pay or not pay for? 
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