Eldercare Resources

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 5 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 5 of 5)

This is the last part of my 5 part my long-distance family caregiving series. In recent weeks we have been covering the story of a lady named Sally who has several health problems, has been hospitalized quite a bit, and is at risk of being placed into a long-term care facility.
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 4 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 4 of 5)

This is part 4 of my five-part long-distance family caregiving series. In parts 1, 2 and 3 we discussed Sally’s health challenges, the results of her long-term care survey, and the team of professionals needed to help Sally remain in her home happily while getting good care. The survey asks very good questions such as where (in their private residence or in a retirement community) your loved one would like to be cared for, who wo
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 3 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 3 of 5)

This is part 3 of my long-distance family caregiving series. In parts 1 and 2, we discussed Sally’s health challenges, the lack of a long-term care plan, the stress associated with her care, and the steps I used to help Sally and her son. First, I conducted a long-term care survey with an in-home care assessment.
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 2 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 2 of 5)

Sally has to decide to either go into an assisted living community or stay at home. Her son lives on the east coast, and he does not have a plan to care for his mom from afar. His dad (Sally's husband and then caregiver) died recently. So how do I begin to help Sally and her son? This is a popular question amongst caregiving families
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How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 1 of 5)

How do you care from afar when your loved one is elderly & chronically ill? (Part 1 of 5)

Caring from afar is also known as long-distance family caregiving. This series is inspired by a son who lives on the east coast but cares for an aging parent in our community. Can you picture this situation? Mother (Sally, made up name) is 85 years old.
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Improving hydration in older adults

Improving hydration in older adults

Someone once said, "Sure, Katie, sounds easy for you to say, but I can't get my mom to drink enough water." If this is your experience, you are not alone. Today I will share tips for improving hydration in older adults, but first, here is why water is SO important.
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How to speed up your loved one's recovery after a hospital stay

How to speed up your loved one's recovery after a hospital stay

 If you search on Google, you might find a long list of providers, and if you call the council on aging, you will get a ton of information. However, how do you know which service to get, and how do you know what Medicare will pay or not pay for? 
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What if you suddenly have to decide about putting your loved on in an assisted living facility

What if you suddenly have to decide about putting your loved on in an assisted living facility

...how do you know which agency to choose, and who can you trust to deliver the kind of services that you truly need at the price that you can afford? What about Medicare, Medicaid, and secondary insurance? What do they pay for, and how quickly can you get the services you need?
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How a sitter or advocate can help your loved one recover from a hospital or rehab stay

How a sitter or advocate can help your loved one recover from a hospital or rehab stay

Last time, we identified the top three reasons why being in a hospital or rehab is challenging for an older adult and why it makes the cost of care so expensive. The three reasons are;

  1. Physical inactivity

  2. Dehydration

  3. Complex/multiple comorbidities.

The first thing to do is to put an advocate at the bedside. Any adult can serve as an advocate and you can hire an advocate. Some people use a sitter but you would want to have the sitter serve as an advocate. An advocate is someone who looks out for the best interest of another person. What are some of the things that the sitter/advocate can do to help your loved one get better?

Think of those top three reasons why being in the hospital is challenging.

  • For inactivity, have your advocate/sitter check in with the nurse to be sure that your loved one gets out of the bed, sit up in the chair or even walk around the room if the doctor's orders do not say "bed rest." Walking will reduce anxiety and prevent deconditioning.

  • For dehydration, have the sitter/advocate offer small sips of water every half to one hour after checking with the nurse to be sure that there are no fluid or eating restrictions.

  • Lastly, the reason that your loved one went to the hospital in the first place. Have the sitter/advocate ready with a notebook and two colored ink pens. One color to write down how the day went, who came into the room, what was done and when who asked questions and answered questions. The other color ink would be to write down what the doctor or nurse says when they come into the room. Looking at the notes from the sitter/advocate, you can tell if your loved one is getting better.

If you have a loved one in the hospital or rehab and he/she is not making progress, call or email me and will be here to help you, 503-369-2460 or katie@comfort-makers.com

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What you can do to help your loved one get better faster after a hospital or rehab stay

What you can do to help your loved one get better faster after a hospital or rehab stay

ONE FALL CAN CHANGE EVERYTHING and that is what has inspired me to begin this series on how to help your loved one get better faster after a hospital or rehab stay.
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How to reduce the cost of in-home elder care

How to reduce the cost of in-home elder care

For every day that an older adult spends in a hospital or rehab, they need three to five days to return to their pre-hospital level of functioning. There are three things that I do to help my clients to lower their costs.
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Assisted Living At Home - Self-Care Is Important For ElderCare

Assisted Living At Home - Self-Care Is Important For ElderCare

Thank you for being a loyal reader. The last time, we discussed Sundowners Syndrome. One of the five things you could do to help your loved one who suffers from Sundowners Syndrome is to care for yourself. Today, we are discussing strategies for caring for yourself, so that your care recipient can THRIVE.

What are some strategies for self-care?

It may take some time to find the best way to care for yourself as you care for someone experiencing Sundowners. Here are a few strategies worth considering.

  • First, STAY CALM & MASTER YOUR EMOTIONS AS MUCH AS POSSIBLE. Sundowners cause fear and anxiety. Do not argue with your loved one. Listen to their concerns and validate their feelings, all the while reassuring that they are is safe. Feeling heard will comfort and calm your loved one. They will lean on you for comfort and reassurance. Also, emotions are attractors, so anxiety in you will trigger anxiety in your loved one. When your loved one thrives, your role as the caregiver becomes more gratifying than stressful.

  • Second, develop a LONG TERM CARE PLAN FOR YOUR LOVED ONE. Most of the stress associated with family caregiving comes from the lack of a caregiving plan. If you would like a copy of our free e-book on how to design a personalized long-term care plan for your loved one, contact Comfort Makers at 503-369-2460.

  • Third, MAKE RESPITE CARE A PRIORITY. Respite care provides short-term relief for primary caregivers. It can be arranged for just an afternoon or for several days or weeks. Care can be provided at home, in a healthcare facility, or at an adult day center. Caregiving can be taxing, both emotionally and physically. Respite care is a beautiful part of self-care. Respite care is an investment in the health of your loved one too.

Finding someone your loved one feels comfortable with, other than yourself, so you can take breaks, take naps during the day, spend time with friends and keep up on your own hobbies is part of your respite plan. Also, Comfort Makers provides respite care services.

When care is needed, there is a caregiver in need. It is my hope that when it is your turn to care, I can always be there for you and your loved one.

–Katie

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